Our full gin review directory, we have over 20 gin reviews listed here from more than 9 different countries and we’re adding all the time.  We have gin reviews for gins from England, Scotland, the USA, Canada, Ireland, Japan, N.Ireland, Italy and Germany. They’re listed alphabetically.

Price range guide:

G        Standard gin  [usually up to USD $35 / GBP £25 /CAD $45 for 70cl*]

GG      Mid-range gin [usually up to USD $50 / GBP £35 / CAD $60 for 70cl*]

GGG   Premium gin  [usually over USD $50 / GBP £35 / CAD $60 for 70cl*]

*Please do check bottle size and exact price when ordering; we’ve converted to price per 70cl bottle (the most common size) for price comparison purposes, but bottle sizes do vary. Also, please note that both ABV and price may vary slightly between marketplace too. That’s globalisation and local taste for you.

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A as in “another gin please.”

Ableforth’s Bathtub Gin

Name: Ableforth’s Bathtub Gin

Country of origin: England

Price guide: GG

Goes well with: Tonic

Sample botanicals: Juniper; cinnamon; clove; cardamom

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 43.3%

In the UK, you can buy Ableforth’s from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, although they don’t have Ableforth’s, you can buy gin from Drizly by clicking here.

This gin is one of a range of Ableforth’s gins that area available. The ‘Bathtub Gin’ style is a real cracker.  We love the old-school packaging; it’s wrapped, strung and wax-sealed (by hand).

We loved this gin. It’s a clean gin with some spicy notes. It’s produced using a method called cold compounding (part of the gin is infused with the botanicals then blended back in). We think that method really enhances the flavour. We definitely preferred it with tonic though. The wide range of Ableforth gins allow you to try something a bit different too, but they all come with the same stylish appearance.

We say: “We’d buy this just for the packaging alone, but the gin tastes great too. Try the Navy-Strength variety for a real kick – it’s an award-winner with a heck of a punch to it.”

Aviation American Gin

Name: Aviation American Gin

Country of origin: USA

Price guide: GG

Goes well with: Tonic; elderflower tonic; grapefruit

Sample botanicals: Juniper; cardamom; lavender; sarsaparilla

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 42%

In the UK, you can buy Aviation from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Aviation Gin from Drizly by clicking here

This is the gin from Portland that Ryan Reynolds liked so much he bought the company. Or a significant stake of it at least. It describes itself as a ‘renegade’ type of gin, perhaps it’s not unsurprising that this is Ryan Reynold’s favourite gin (or favorite for our large Amercian readership…what’s a missing ‘u’ between global gin lovers?)

A bold gin in that it takes quite a different path from ‘traditional’ gins. It’s a gin that hans’t been scared to tackle the dominance of the juniper taste, and is part of the emerging ‘New Western Dry’ style in this regard. Think floral and spice and you’re not far away for the style here, but we think it’s quite unique and sampling it has led to different taste experiences.

We say: “Well worth a go if not tried before. Like Ryan Reynolds it’s an acquired taste, but we like it. And Mr Reynolds. Enjoyed best with Deadpool. Or elderflower tonic.”

 

B as in “botanicals.”

Bombay Sapphire 

Name: Bombay Sapphire

Country of origin: England

Price guide: G

Goes well with: Tonic; elderflower tonic

Sample botanicals: Juniper; coriander; cassia; angelica root

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 40%

In the UK, you can buy Bombay Sapphire from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Bombay Sapphire from Drizly by clicking here

A distinctive blue, square-sided bottle contains this popular gin. It’s got a wide-ranging appeal.

A gin that whichgin.com has been familiar with for a number of years, Bombay Sapphire seemed to be the start of gins becoming a little bit different. It represented a right of passage from other mass market gins into something more special. It’s got a general drinking appeal, and we think it’s a gin that works best with tonic (of any type) and a slice of lime.

We say: “A great gin that will suit most tastes. We think it makes a benchmark gin and tonic.”

The Botanist Islay Dry Gin

Name: The Botanist Islay Dry Gin

Country of origin: Scotland

Price guide: GG

Goes well with: Neat; tonic; ginger ale

Sample botanicals: Juniper; coriander; aniseed

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 46%

In the UK, you can buy The Botanist from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy The Botanist from Drizly by clicking here

This gin is from the island of Islay, off the west coast of Scotland. Islay isn’t pronounced how it looks. The ‘y’ is silent and, even then, the ‘is’ isn’t pronounced ‘is’. It’s more of an ‘iyh-la’. No matter, this gin is a fantastic blend of nine botanicals and over twenty locally foraged herbs.

The gin tastes fresh and smooth. Surprisingly, we didn’t find it to have much of a floral taste despite all those botanicals and herbs. It’s actually made by the same distillery as Bruichladdich whisky, but has nothing of that pattern at all (we find Bruichladdich to be one of the stronger tasting drams). We’ve had it neat over ice, and it went well with a touch of ginger ale too.

We say: “Forget trying to pronounce the name of the island of Islay, and don’t even try Bruichladdich. Sit back and enjoy a super-smooth gin instead.”

Brockmans Gin

Name: Brockmans Gin

Country of origin: England

Price guide: GG

Goes well with: Neat; tonic; ginger ale

Sample botanicals: Juniper; blackberry; blueberry; angelica root

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 40%

In the UK, you can buy Brockmans from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Brockmans from Drizly by clicking here

This is 70cl of smooth drinking gin in a moody black bottle. A heady mixture of ten botanicals are at work here. Their oils and aromas have been released by hours of steeping in pure grain spirit.

We were quite taken by this gin and noted its particularly fruity and berry-like notes. Judging by other reviews we’ve seen, many also seem to have been converted to this being their main gin choice on first try, which is testament to how well the team at Brockmans have done to land on a winning taste. The hundreds of attempts they made at perfecting the recipe for their old copper still have clearly paid off. A smooth gin that really works.

We say: “The positive reviews alone make it worth giving Brockmans Gin a try. A smooth gin that you can drink neat over ice.”

Broker’s Gin 

Name: Broker’s Gin

Country of origin: England

Price guide: G

Goes well with: Tonic

Sample botanicals: Juniper; orris root; angelica root

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 40%

In the UK, you can buy Broker’s Gin from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Broker’s Gin from Drizly by clicking here

From the heart of England comes this traditional gin. We love the top hat on the bottle, although doubt we would suit it as well as the owners do.

To taste, this is a really-well balanced gin. We didn’t really get much of anything coming through, but that’s not a criticism (and others may well do). Actually, we decided to water this one down with less tonic on second tasting and that worked well. We’re less convinced by drinking neat. However you enjoy it, this gin is an absolute steal for the price. We think it tastes better than many more premium (premium in terms of price at least) gins.

We say: “A real gem of a gin at a very reasonable price point. Try with just a little tonic and a slice of lime.”

C as in “citrus-y; is that even a word?”

Caorunn Small Batched Scottish Gin

Name: Caorunn Small Batched Scottish Gin

Country of origin: Scotland

Price guide: GG

Goes well with: Tonic; elderflower tonic

Sample botanicals: Juniper; heather; apple; rowan berry

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 41.8%

In the UK, you can buy Caorunn from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Caorunn from Drizly by clicking here

This gin is the distilled essence of Scotland in a glass. Caorunn is pronounced “Kar-roon” and you’re handily reminded of this on the clean lines of the bottle.

This gin also has apple as a botanical, and that’s what we got on first taste. It has a really pleasing clean taste. It feels very fresh. The recommended serving is with (red) apple. We liked it with the apple; it was an excellent companion to the crisp notes in there. There’s also heather and rowan berry too. Apparently Caorunn is the old gaelic name for the rowan berry. Like we said, this is a very Scottish gin! We also tried Caorunn with both normal and elderflower tonic. We think the elderflower lifted it even more, but it was by no means a necessity if you don’t like the sweeter taste.

We say: “A gin as Scottish as haggis and bagpipes. We love the fresh, clean taste. Pair it with regular or elderflower tonic for a really smooth drink.”

D as in “due another gin.”

Death’s Door Gin

Name: Death’s Door Gin

Country of origin: USA

Price guide: GGG

Goes well with: Neat; tonic

Sample botanicals: Juniper; coriander; fennel

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 47%

In the UK, you can buy Death’s Door from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Death’s Door from Drizly by clicking here

We love a good back story for a gin, and this one is a cracker. Making this gin has reinvigorated farming in this part of the US. The ‘Death’s Door’ name actually comes from the body of water that an ingredient needs to cross to get to the distillery. Although it could also possibly reasonably refer to the strength at 47%.

Strangely, as no fans of fennel generally, we really enjoyed this gin. Fennel isn’t particularly common as a botanical in gin, possibly as it can overpower. We didn’t find that at all. We certainly got in in the nose, but it was well balanced through the taste. It’s a robust gin that works well neat. We quite liked it with the edge off a little. It worked well with tonic and would probably also work well as the base of a gin cocktail too.

We say: “Short on botanical numbers but high on taste. A thumping good gin that can hold its own in any company.”

Drumshanbo Gunpowder Irish Gin 

Name: Drumshanbo Gunpowder Irish Gin

Country of origin: Ireland

Price guide: GGG

Goes well with: Tonic; grapefruit

Sample botanicals: Juniper; orris root; gunpowder tea; star anise

Bottle size: 50cl

ABV: 43%

In the UK, you can buy Drumshanbo from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Drumshanbo from Drizly by clicking here

This smaller bottle should not be mistaken for containing a small gin. This has a real kick. The blue bottle reminds us of a 1930’s lampshade. Just us then.

The gunpowder tea in this gin makes it unique (as far as we know, we’ve not come across any other gins with gunpowder tea; let us know if you have). We think this gives it a really robust taste. The other taste that really comes through to us is the star anise (without looking at the list of botanicals beforehand, we noted an aniseed taste). Ours was served with grapefruit slices, and we think that was great way to drink this gin. It has a fairly strong aroma if that’s to your taste; we’re big fans

We say: “We think gunpowder gin tastes best with tonic and a slice of grapefruit. One if you like a robust gin like us.”

E as in “elderflower tonic.”

Eden Mill Love Gin

Name: Eden Mill Love Gin

Country of origin: Scotland

Price guide: GGG

Goes well with: Neat; tonic; elderflower tonic

Sample botanicals: Juniper; coriander; rhubarb root; goji berry

Bottle size: 50cl

ABV: 42%

In the UK, you can buy Eden Mill from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Eden Mill from Drizly by clicking here

Perhaps as it sounds (and looks) a bit like a novelty product for seduction, this small bottle of gin is lovely and subtle. The packaging is great, as with all Eden Mill gin. The bottle looks fantastic.

The subtle taste of this gin is quite floral and natural. There’s nothing overpowering here. Perhaps because of the goji berry and rhubarb root in here there was a slight pink tinge to this gin. There are also hibiscus flowers infused post distillation. We see now where the ‘love’ moniker comes from. It’s definitely quite a sweet gin, and probably not one for lovers of more potent botanicals. We got fragrant vanilla notes coming through.

We say: “We love the love gin. We think best served neat with or without ice, and without any strong citrus fruits.”

F as in “feels like gin.”

We need to review a gin beginning with F. Got any suggestions? Please let us know in the comments below.

G as in “um…let me think…giraffe.”

Glendalough Wild Botanical Gin

Name: Glendalough Wild Botanical Gin

Country of origin: Ireland

Price guide: GG

Goes well with: Tonic; elderflower tonic; grapefruit

Sample botanicals: Juniper; mountain flora

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 41%

In the UK, you can buy Glendalough from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Glendalough from Drizly by clicking here

The open arms on the bottle almost implore you to try this gin. A classic gin bottle for a classy gin. Take yourself off to those Irish hills my bhoy.

Perhaps it’s the story of the fresh wild botanicals being foraged in the Co.Wickow hills in Ireland, but this gin tastes fresh and clean. You can taste the floral notes here and the juniper sings through too for the gin purist. This is how a good gin should taste. We love this with a normal tonic, but elderflower tonic also works with the whole picture. For a bit of kick, we also add a slice of grapefruit.

We say: “A real favourite of ours. Try with tonic and savour the clean taste.”

H as in “how many gins have we had?”

Hendrick’s Gin

Country of origin: Scotland

Price guide: GG

Goes well with: Tonic; elderflower tonic; cucumber

Sample botanicals: Juniper; orris root; elderflower; coriander

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 41.4%

In the UK, you can buy Hendrick’s from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Hendrick’s from Drizly by clicking here

It took us a while to try Hendrick’s Gin, and we’re annoyed with ourselves for taking so long.

This is a distinctive and delicate gin that works brilliantly with tonic, ice and a slice of cucumber as a garnish. We’d add slightly more tonic than normal, and that will really bring out the delicate, floral taste. Hendrick’s prides itself on being a slightly unusual gin, and we’d agreed with their assessment following tasting. It’s made in quite small batches in Girvan, Scotland (a nice little town on the west coast). We think you can taste the craft and effort in this gin. We try many gins here at whichgin.com, and Hendrick’s has become a very quick hit. Nice bottle too (if that’s your thing).

We say: “Don’t leave it as long as us to try Hendrick’s Gin. Unlike anything we’ve tasted, and a real treat.”

I as in “ice (ice baby).”

We need to review a gin beginning with I. Got any suggestions? Please let us know in the comments below.

J as in “juniper. And Jennifer. Rides a dappled mare. Ask your parents.”

Jawbox Small Batch Classic Dry Gin

Name: Jawbox Small Batch Classic Dry Gin

Country of origin: N.Ireland

Price guide: GG

Goes well with: Ginger ale; tonic

Sample botanicals: Juniper; cardamom; lavender; sarsaparilla

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 43%

In the UK, you can buy Jawbox from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, although they don’t have Jawbox, you can buy gin from Drizly by clicking here.

This is a solid gin from N.Ireland and is a whichgin.com staple after being introduced to it in 2017 in an old Irish farmhouse. If you’ve never been to N.Ireland, you certainly should. That’s not just for the gin; the welcome and scenery are something else.

Back to the gin after that tourist announcement on behalf of the N.Irish tourist office. Jawbone is a gin that has a real punch, and pairs really well with ginger ale. Friends of whichgin.com have described this gin’s taste as peppery and like flaked chilli. Strangely, it was also described by one friend of whichgin.com as being “…like I’m in a Swiss field.” Thank you, Paul S, for that unusually floral review.

We say: “Pairing Jawbox gin with ginger ale is a great option. Whether you ultimately find Swiss fields or peppery notes is down to taste.”

K as in “king of drinks.”

We need to review a gin beginning with K. Got any suggestions? Please let us know in the comments below.

L as in “large gin.”

We need to review a gin beginning with L. Got any suggestions? Please let us know in the comments below.

M as in “more gin.”

Malfy Originale Gin

Name: Malfy Originale Gin

Country of origin: Italy

Price guide: GG

Goes well with: Tonic

Sample botanicals: Juniper; coriander; liquorice; angelica root

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 41%

In the UK, you can buy Malfy from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Malfy from Drizly by clicking here

A really distinct nautical-y bottle that makes this look like a crisp, clean gin. Actually, we thought that before we read the back story that explains that this is a gin that pays homage to ancient gins from the Italian Amalfi coast. So we feel quite good about that even though, in hindsight, nautical-y isn’t really a word. And why do we pay homage? It’s like when the weather is always described as being bitterly cold. We’re digressing.

This gin tastes just like the bottle looks. We loved the fresh taste of it, and we could get too used to drinking it. The distillers describe this gin as having a bit of a citrus taste. We agree, and imagine that’s down to the lemon and grapefruit peel that’s in there showing through. Interestingly, we didn’t get any real taste lingering on the palate having tried this gin with a simple tonic and slice of lime as suggested. Bravo Malfy. Or is it brava? We’ve never figured out any language that has male and female things.

We say: “Our first foray into Italian gin and it won’t be our last. A nice, clean drinking gin that makes for a fantastic gin and tonic.”

Martin Miller’s Gin

Name: Martin Miller’s Gin

Country of origin: England

Price guide: G

Goes well with: Tonic; elderflower tonic

Sample botanicals: Juniper; orris root; cassia bark; angelica root

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 40%

In the UK, you can buy Martin Miller’s from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Martin Miller’s from Drizly by clicking here

A bit of fusion of England and Iceland is what greets you on the bottle (which is a looker and emphasises the purity). Read up on the Cod Wars (not the Cold War) if you want to know why harmony between the UK and Iceland can only be a good thing. This is very reasonably priced gin. It feels more premium than the price suggests.

It’s a smooth gin, with a pleasing finish to it. We didn’t really find it majored on any particular taste, but was interesting enough to be drunk neat over ice. Perhaps the marketing of the pure Icelandic water used to bring it to its 40% ABV played on our mind and made us try it over the ice in the first place. We actually think it went better with an elderflower tonic, but any tonic would probably do.

We say: “A little bit of English taste and a little bit of Icelandic purity. Try this gin with elderflower tonic to really bring it alive.”

Monkey 47 Schwarzwald Dry Gin

Name: Monkey 47 Schwarzwald Dry Gin

Country of origin: Germany

Price guide: GGG

Goes well with: Tonic; elderflower tonic

Sample botanicals: Juniper; cranberries; coriander; liquorice

Bottle size: 50cl

ABV: 47%

In the UK, you can buy Monkey from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Monkey from Drizly by clicking here

This is a relatively expensive gin but, my word, does it deliver on taste. It’s quite a small bottle too. It distilled to 47% and has 47 (yes, 47) botanicals. It’s a gin from Germany that has a hist of perfectionism about it. That’s no bad thing. Some of the botanicals, including local cranberries, are foraged from the Black Forest area.

This gin is complex. That’s maybe not surprising given the 47 botanicals. Our overwhelming taste sensation was of juniper and citrus flavours. There was also a hint of pine in there too. We preferred it with tonic, but it matched well neat over ice with grapefruit too.

We say: “A triumph of German distilling. There’s no faulting the effort that’s gone into this or the taste that results.”

N as in “neat gin.”

We need to review a gin beginning with N. Got any suggestions? Please let us know in the comments below.

O as in “orris root.”

Opihr Oriental Spiced London Dry Gin

Name: Opihr Oriental Spiced London Dry Gin

Country of origin: England

Price guide: GG

Goes well with: Elderflower tonic; tonic; ginger ale

Sample botanicals: Juniper; coriander; black pepper; cubebs

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 40%

In the UK, you can buy Opihr from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Opihr from Drizly by clicking here

This is a gin that wears it’s colours very clearly. The bottle sports a tassle. There’s probably a more accurate word than tassle, but we couldn’t think of one. A gin that can clear the pipes and can’t be accused of being short on taste.

A really different gin and the oriental influence is very clear. Quite a pungent gin own the nose, we really got the coriander and pepper coming through. This isn’t one for the faint-hearted, but great if (like us) you like a bit of hit from your gin. After trying with elderflower tonic, which worked well, we ventured onto ginger ale as a mixer. Both were good, but the ginger ale just matched this taste brilliantly and was the clear winner for us. We’ve also seen a suggestion that this would pair well served with sprig of rosemary. We haven’t tried that yet but it could certainly work; this is a big flavour gin that needs something that can match it.

We say: “Doesn’t fail to deliver on a taste of the Orient. A rumbustious peppery taste that is a great match for ginger ale.”

P as in “pass me the gin.”

Plymouth Original Dry Gin

Name: Plymouth Original Dry Gin

Country of origin: England

Price guide: GG

Goes well with: Tonic

Sample botanicals: Juniper; coriander; cardamom

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 41.2%

In the UK, you can buy Plymouth from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Plymouth from Drizly by clicking here

This gin is older than some countries, having been around since 1793. You couldn’t really get a much more traditional style of bottle if you tried. It works for us. You can almost imagine sailors of yore sitting with a bottle in a dark Plymouth pub before boarding their ship for a far off land. Like Wales. The gin itself has protected status, and is made with water from Dartmoor. This is quite a soft water, and we think helps balance the gin.

This gin feels like it fills your mouth, but in a really unusual way. We didn’t find it overpowering, but we ended up adding a splash more tonic. We certainly got the juniper here – unsurprising for a more traditional style of gin. We also got a bit of cardamom. Not too much, which we think is a good thing as we’re not massive fans of cardamom. If you really want to push the boat out (see where we’re going here), try the Navy Strength version at 57%. It tastes quite similar and is more expensive, and we’d limit the intake, but remains remarkably smooth.

We say: “This is a great, honest gin that tastes great with tonic and a slice of lemon. We can see why this gin has been around for over two centuries.”

Q as in “quinine.”

We need to review a gin beginning with Q. Got any suggestions? Please let us know in the comments below.

R as in “right, I need a gin.”

Roku Japanese Craft Gin

Name: Roku Japanese Craft Gin

Country of origin: Japan (or Germany we think)

Price guide: GG

Goes well with: Elderflower tonic; tonic

Sample botanicals: Juniper; coriander; yuzu peel

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 43%

In the UK, you can buy Roku from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Roku from Drizly by clicking here

Well done. You have managed to learn your first Japanese word: Roku. Roku means six which, by huge co-incidence, is the number of Japanese sourced botanicals in this gin. These are added to some more ‘traditional’ botanicals in this craft gin. Great bottle here. Six-sided. We see what they did there.

This gin tasted different after multiple tries. Sorry if that’s not helpful. The first time we tried it we got quite a citrus hit. It has a few citrus fruit botanicals, so that’s not a surprise. Subsequent tastes have given us more of a balance and a lighter taste. We’re not familiar with the Japanese botanicals involved here, which include sakura flower and leaf. They maybe just took a few drinks to show themselves. Seemed like a fair enough excuse. We thought it worked best with elderflower tonic. A serving suggestion is with ginger (not ginger ale – which we think would overpower it). We haven’t tried it with fresh ginger – let us know what you think if you do.

We say: “An unusual and very pleasant gin that we can’t quite pin down taste-wise. Well worth a try if you fancy something different with some delicate Japanese character.”

S as in “seriously, pass me the gin.”

Sipsmith London Dry Gin

Name: Sipsmith London Dry Gin

Country of origin: England

Price guide: GG

Goes well with: Tonic

Sample botanicals: Juniper; and others…

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 41.6%

In the UK, you can buy Sipsmith from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Sipsmith from Drizly by clicking here

A lovely traditional gin inspired by a recipe from yesteryear, all packaged up in a bottle with a swan emerging from a still; how very British. 

We couldn’t find out much about the botanicals in this and, admittedly, we’ve only tasted this one in a bar. We had it served as gin and tonic with a wedge of lime. The predominant taste we had coming through was oranges. And lemons. This just added to the Britishness of the gin. It was a very pleasant citrusy experience. We’re not entirely convinced by this one neat (we had a sip before adding the bottle of tonic), and would suggest you try with a tonic. The lime went well, but a slither of orange or lemon would also work well.

We say: “A fresh citrusy gin that’s great for a gin and tonic.”

T as in “tonic. A gin is a real tonic.”

 

Tanqueray Dry London Gin

Name: Tanqueray Dry London Gin

Country of origin: Scotland

Price guide: G

Goes well with: Neat; tonic; elderflower tonic; ginger ale

Sample botanicals: Juniper; coriander; angelica root; liquorice

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 43.1%

In the UK, you can buy Tanqueray from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Tanqueray from Drizly by clicking here

This gin is really popular in the United States but, perhaps surprisingly, doesn’t have quite such a strong following in the UK. It’s a top-seller in the the American market. Please note that the ABV does vary for this gin between the various markets too. We tasted ours in Majorca, Spain.

This gin is based on a secret recipe. It’s a bit of a pity that only four of the botanicals are known, although that does give for an interesting guessing game. What do you taste in there? We find Tanquerary particularly good for gin and tonic although, actually, it’s also a bit of an all-rounder. It certainly is on the dry side of the taste spectrum, but we’ve also had this one neat over ice with a slice of grapefruit. Others have suggested it’s a gin that goes with elderflower tonic or ginger ale too.

We say: “A top selling gin in the USA that seems to have generally not been tried by others. A really good all-rounder to have.”

U as in “Uzbekistan. I assume they drink gin in Uzbekistan.”

Ungava Canadian Premium Gin

Name: Ungava Canadian Premium Gin

Country of origin: Canada

Price guide: GG

Goes well with: Neat; tonic; grapefruit

Sample botanicals: Juniper; Labrador tea; crowberry; rosehips

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 43.1%

In the UK, you can buy Ungava from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can buy Ungava from Drizly by clicking here

Despite the slightly unfortunate hue of this gin, don’t be fooled by appearances. This is a Canadian gin that isn’t afraid to be different. It’s a unique gin with a unique taste.

This gin made us say a little “oooh” on first taste. Not a bad “oooh”, just a “that’s a bit different” type of oooh. It really grew on us. The berries in this (crowberry and cloudberry, both of which were new to whichgin.com tasters) make for what we considered to be a complex gin. We really liked the fact it tasted both sweet and almost sour in the mouth. Perhaps sour isn’t even the right term; tart might be better. The recommended accompaniment is a slice of grapefruit – we agree.

We say: “A unique Canadian gin that makes your mouth water. Some tonic and a slice of grapefruit makes for a hugely rewarding experience.”

V as in “Vanuatu. See Uzbekistan.”

We need to review a gin beginning with V. Got any suggestions? Please let us know in the comments below.

W as in “which gin.”

We need to review a gin beginning with W. Got any suggestions? Please let us know in the comments below.

X as in “Xanadu. See Vanuatu and Uzbekistan.”

We need to review a gin beginning with X. Got any suggestions? Please let us know in the comments below.

Y as in “yachts. Let’s drink gin on our yacht.”

York London Dry Gin

Name: York London Dry Gin

Country of origin: England

Price guide: GGG

Goes well with: To be confirmed upon review

Sample botanicals: Juniper; black pepper; cardamom; lemon peel

Bottle size: 70cl

ABV: 42.5%

In the UK, you can buy York London Dry Gin from Amazon by clicking here

In the US/Canada, you can’t buy York London Dry Gin from Drizly, but you can try the others gins they have by clicking here for Drizly gins

Ok. Confession time. We’ve not actually reviewed York London Dry Gin yet. However, since they were first to reply to us on our first ever Twitter post, and we love York here at whichgin.com, we’ll make an exception and add this Y gin a little early! You can read more about this gin at the York Gin Distillery website in the meantime.

We say: “Well, nothing yet. But we think York London Dry Gin looks very promising and there’s a set of a award-winning gins to try.”

Z as in “zoo. Let’s drink gin at the zoo.”

We need to review a gin beginning with Z. Got any suggestions? Please let us know in the comments below.

Our feature image for this page was by Kevin Wenning on Unsplash

2 Comments

    • Hello Paul, and sorry for the delay replying. Which is your favourite and we’ll try to change that for you?!

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